ANN ARBOR, MI — A recent study conducted by NSF International a non-profit public health and safety organization, found that toilets and door handles actually had fewer germs than other common surfaces, according to a press release received by CM e-News DailyTM today. NSF recently collected and tested samples from schools and found as many as 2.7 million bacterial cells per square inch on common school surfaces, such as water fountains, desks, computer keyboards, bus seats and cafeteria trays, according to the release. Other NSF findings, according to the release, include:

  • Commonly cleaned areas, such as desks and doorknobs had fewer germs (19 bacterial cells per square inch and 5 bacterial cells per square inch respectively), while computer keyboards and ear phones had significantly more at 260 bacterial cells per square inch and 740 bacterial cells per square inch respectively.
  • Drinking water fountain spigots had the highest amount of bacteria on the tested surfaces — 2.7 million bacterial cells per square inch.
  • A cafeteria tray had more than ten times as many germs as a toilet seat (33,800 bacterial cells/ per square inch vs. 3,200 bacterial cells per square inch).
  • A student”s hand had 1,500 bacterial cells per square inch.
  • Commonly cleaned areas, such as desks and doorknobs had fewer germs (19 bacterial cells per square inch and 5 bacterial cells per square inch respectively), while computer keyboards and ear phones had significantly more at 260 bacterial cells per square inch and 740 bacterial cells per square inchrespectively.
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